Quick Answer: Is It Davis Or Davis’S?

Do you ever use S’s?

With a singular compound noun (for example, mother-in-law), show possession with an apostrophe + s at the end of the word.

If the compound noun (e.g., brother-in-law) is to be made plural, form the plural first (brothers-in-law), and then use the apostrophe + s..

What is the difference between S and S?

Both express possession, of course. We use ‘s with singular nouns. For example, “my son’s toys” will be “the toys that belong to my son”. We use only an apostrophe (‘) after plural nouns that end in -s: “my sons’ toys” means that I have more than one son and these are their toys.

Is it the Smiths or the Smith’s?

The Smith’s (with an apostrophe before the s) is the possessive of “Smith” and indicates one person ownership. The Smiths’ (with an apostrophe after the s) is plural possessive and means the possession of more than one “Smith” of something (see Rule 2 below) like “The Smiths’ house is white.”

How do you make Charles possessive?

So in summary: Traditionally, the possessive of Charles is Charles’s, pronounced “Charlz-uhz.” According to the new rules, the possessive of Charles is Charles’, which can be pronounced either “Charlz” or “Charlz-uhz.”

What is the possessive form of baby?

Singular and Plural Possessive NounsABbabybaby’sbabiesbabies’citycity’scitiescities’96 more rows

What is the plural form of Davis?

The Davises (“The Davis Family” would also work.) To make a name ending in “s” plural, you need to add “es”.

How do you make a possessive last name S?

The general rule for forming possessives The possessive of a plural noun is formed by adding only an apostrophe when the noun ends in s, and by adding both an apostrophe and s when it ends in a letter other than s.

Is S’s correct?

Use an apostrophe + S (‘s) to show that one person/thing owns or is a member of something. Yes, even if the name ends in “s,” it’s still correct to add another “‘s” to create the possessive form. It is also acceptable to add only an apostrophe to the end of singular nouns that end in “s” to make them possessive.

Is there an apostrophe in your last name?

Adding an apostrophe makes the last name possessive, which is unnecessary in this case. Depending on the last letter of the name, simply add –s or –es. Signing a card, “Happy holidays from the Smiths!” correctly includes the entire family in the message’s sentiment.

How do you pluralize the last name Jones?

You make Jones plural by adding “es” because it ends in “s,” but adding an apostrophe and “s” after that would make it difficult to pronounce (Joneseses) so you just add the apostrophe.

What is the plural form of Harris?

The noun harris is uncountable. The plural form of harris is also harris. Find more words!

How do you pluralize a name that ends in s?

Names are pluralized like regular words. Add -es for names ending in “s” or “z” and add -s for everything else. When indicating the possessive, if there is more than one owner add an apostrophe to the plural; if there is one owner, add ‘s to the singular (The Smiths’ car vs.

What is correct James or James’s?

James’ birthday, or James’s. The proper convention is to include the possessive apostrophe even when the word ends in an “s.” So “James’s” is correct. The only exception to that are proper nouns so well established that traditionally they have always been used with just an apostrophe.

Is it Thomas or Thomas’s?

Thomas’s house. The important thing to remember is that Thomas is singular. When you’re talking about more than one, you first form that plural by adding -ES. One Thomas, two Thomases.

What is the possessive of James?

To form the possessive of a noun that ends in S, AP style has separate rules for proper names and generic nouns. For proper names like James, AP says, add an apostrophe only: He borrowed James’ car. For generics like boss, add an apostrophe plus S: He borrowed the boss’s car.

Is it Williams or Williams’s?

The name Williams is tougher because it ends with s. Names (and all other nouns, for that matter) that end in sibilants (that is, the sounds s, sh, ch, z, or x) are made plural by the addition of es. Thus the name Williams in its plural form is Williamses.

Is it Chris’s or Chris?

The truth is that Chris takes just an apostrophe only if you follow the rules in the The Associated Press Stylebook. In other style guides, Chris takes an apostrophe and an s: Chris’s. … Form the possessive of singular nouns and abbreviations by adding an apostrophe and an s.

Is Williams’s correct?

The Associated Press Stylebook recommends just an apostrophe: It’s Tennessee Williams’ best play. But most other authorities endorse ‘s: Williams’s. Williams’s means “belonging to Williams.” It is not the plural form of Williams.

How do you make Harris possessive?

In essence this is, “If it ends with a z sound, treat it like a plural; if it ends with an s sound, treat it like a singular.” Thus they would write “Dickens’, Hopkins’, Williams’,” but also “Harris’s, Thomas’s, Callas’s” and the like.

Is it Jones or Jones’s?

All the English style guides insist that singular possessives are formed with -‘s and plurals with only -‘, so the possessive of Jones (singular) is Jones’s and the possessive of Joneses is Joneses’.

What is the possessive form of Jesus?

Colloquially the possessive of the nominative Jesus is spoken as three syllables, best represented as Jesus’s. I have never heard the allegedly ‘correct’ possessive pronounced as two syllables. That tradition may have died; it’s just taking a while for the written possessive to catch up.